Siblings in sports: rivalries, respect, and everything in between

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Siblings in sports: rivalries, respect, and everything in between

Amy Pan, Staff Writer

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Siblings. The thought itself brings about a wide variety of reactions. There are the days when siblings love one another and get along perfectly—and of course, the times when they are constantly at each other’s throats. But, as far as brothers and sisters go, perhaps there is no better-known dynamic than the classic sibling rivalry. At Parkview, this kind of relationship is frequently found on the school sports teams.

For siblings, playing on the same team in high school can naturally foster an aura of competition, with each one feeling the pressure to outperform the other. Oftentimes, siblings are each other’s biggest challengers. Sisters Jordan and Jessica Moody, who both play on the Parkview softball team, can attest to this. Jessica (10) says, “When we had tryouts, my coach was like, ‘it’s going to be you and your sister battling it out for left field!,’ so it was going to be either me or her playing, and I felt like I had to be really good in that situation.”

Sean Sullivan (10), who runs cross country with his brother, Alex (12), agrees, saying that he sometimes feels the pressure to be better with “running times [his] freshman and sophomore years compared to [his] brother’s.”

Despite the intense rivalry that often results from playing together, being high school teammates can also bring siblings closer. Jordan (12) says, “We just spend so much time together at practice and at games, becoming friends as well as sisters.”

Sisters Maddie and Izzy Ober, who play Parkview soccer together, feel the same way. “Being on the same team helps us bond because it gives us more time together,” says Izzy (11). Maddie (12) adds, “I always have someone I can talk to because she understands me better than anyone.”

With this bonding comes immense encouragement. “Whether I do well or she does well, we’re both happy for each other,” says Maddie. To show their support, older siblings frequently mentor their younger counterparts. Izzy gives an example with soccer training, saying, “Sometimes, [Maddie and I] go out into our backyards and work on PKs. She’s a good example, so I’ll watch her and see how she hits.”

Similarly, Sean sees running cross country with his brother as “good because [Alex] can give [him] tips and advice.”

Being members of the same team in high school can cause intense sibling rivalries, but at the end of the day, siblings are, first and foremost, family. Sharing a common interest and playing a sport that they both love can ultimately form a unique and unbreakable connection between two siblings. Izzy puts it all into perspective as she says, “It’s really cool to glance across the field and see your sibling score. When you look back at the pictures later, you’re with your best friend, and that makes everything ten times better.”