The Parkview Pantera

Out of District Students are a growing concern

Campbell, Hannah

Anika Akbar, Opinions Editor

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For over forty years, Parkview has been the home of the Panthers. However, in recent years, Parkview has become the home of the Panthers, and then some—this extension being those who come from a different cluster or even county. This is not really an issue if a student in good academic, attendance, and disciplinary standing had the correct documentation to be a part of the student body. Without these records, however, a student may face criminal charges for committing fraud with falsified documents if they happen to get caught.

Getting admitted to the school without the proper forms may be as easy as pi to the second decimal place. Staying under the radar is where complications come in. According to Administrator Kristian Dermid and Resource Officer Ricky Herndon, license plate tags from a different county, returned mail initially sent by the school, and even students staying after too long may be indicators that a students are not in the cluster. Oftentimes, the administration may receive anonymous reports of a student who is coming to school illegally. Once the hint is recognized, the license plate tags are run and residency checks are made. “There’s probably way more than we’ll ever get to, but we usually go out a couple times a week and try to find out where they truly do live,” Herndon reported.  If confirmed that the student indeed has falsified the documents that allow them to attend the school they are in, the administration will make a call to the parents or guardians of the student to notify them that their child must be withdrawn from the school, their schedules will be dissolved, and the student should be admitted into their home school.

Students coming from outside of the cluster or district may not seem like much of an issue, right? They probably want to come to the school for a better education or sports programs not offered at their home schools, or even the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) program. The controversy actually goes deeper than that. “It’s an issue because we have to have policies and rules. We have to have restrictions. What happens when we don’t have restrictions? Overcrowding,” explained Dermid. If more students than the school can hold are admitted, the school may not have enough desks, teachers, or even classrooms for these students.

For students who may have been in the Parkview cluster since the days of their youth and have moved to another cluster in the middle of their high school career, these students may apply for a permissive transfer on which both the principal of the new cluster and Parkview’s principal must sign off. However, both signatures may not be guaranteed. The principal of the school which the student may wish to leave can deny them if the school is facing underenrollment. Similarly, the student must be in a favorable academic standing as well as have a minimal amount of unexcused absences/tardies and a clean disciplinary record in order for the principal of the receiving school to accept the student. The principal also has the power to deny the student because of overcrowding. “You want to have your building just right, so to speak…you can’t just sign any permissive because we get a lot,” Dermid expressed.

If a student is admitted into the school on permissive transfer, then they must maintain the standing and records they are in and have or else they will be kicked out and have to attend their home school. Students on permissive, such as senior Ritwika Chakrabarti, normally do not have an issue preserving these records though. Chakrabarti had been a part of the cluster since before she even began her education, but unfortunately moved to Peachtree Ridge High School her sophomore year. She spent the year at the school before she applied for a permissive transfer to come back to Parkview, explaining, “It felt really amazing to come back here because I saw all of my old friends and made new friends who I could build amazing relationships with.”

However, if a student does not approve of the way things are in their home school, Dermid advises, “Be a part of the PTSA in terms of your parents. Insist that they hire good teachers,” adding, “Be a part of the change that makes it a great school.”

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Out of District Students are a growing concern