The Parkview Pantera

Sleep is for the weak when college admissions are involved

Anika Akbar, Editor in chief

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The act of deactivating one’s conscious mind, formally known as sleep, is an essential practice within the daily routine of humanity, especially for teenagers who are still in the developing process. However, with more rigor applied in high school, along with an increased competition of getting admitted into college, we’re all more dead inside than the zombies we often see in movies. The act of deactivating one’s conscious mind, formally known as sleep, is an essential practice within the daily routine of humanity, especially for teenagers who are still in the developing process. However, with more rigor applied in high school, along with an increased competition of getting admitted into college, we’re all more dead inside than the zombies we often see in movies.  To beat the horrendous Parkview traffic in the morning, it is imperative for us to be on Cole Road, Miller Road., or Five Fork Trickum Road by the latest time of 6:35 a.m. This is not much of an issue until we remember our bedtimes range from midnight to ten minutes before our alarms go off, giving us young, developing teens, a total of about six hours of sleep at best. This is about three hours short of the recommended amount of sleep as, according to the Child Mind Institute, teens need an average of 9 hours and fifteen minutes. When it comes to sleep, three hours lost is plenty to keep one from functioning properly. This is extremely problematic as seen by the effects within the classroom: students asleep during lessons, general moodiness, irritability, etc., and we’re only among the 90% of high school students in the nation who are facing the same problems, according to HealthDay NewsWhat’s worse is that this sleep deprivation students face may impact them in the long run as they are more vulnerable to develop depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and/or other mental illnesses. Older generations credit this rising issue to the technological revolution, where easier access to electronics such as cell phones, televisions, computers, etc., hurt our biological rhythm of sleep through the bright screens. This, however, is only partially true, according to the Stanford School of Medicine News Center.  “I think high school is the real danger spot in terms of sleep deprivation…nobody performs at the level they could perform,” William Dement, MD, Ph.D., founder of the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic, explains to Stanford Medicine. Kids are figuratively dying from the importance of the heavy school work thrown onto their shoulders, and this amassed stress is necessary to the college admissions process because it gets harder and harder each year for a student to advance in the professional world. And the early school start times do little to aid against our sleep depravity. I remember when school used to start seven minutes later, which gave me a glorious thirty minutes of extra sleep. But even at starting at 7:30 a.m., the Center for Disease Control and Prevention has found these early hours have ties to performing poorly in school. Just think, we could truly be better than simply the best high school in the nation if we were to sleep more than the five hours we get on average. However, solutions have the ability to generate more issues. The most common solution, a later school start time, therefore, a later end time, creates a, “what if a student has to be at work at 3 p.m.?” Regardless, it is clear that there is an actual issue here and there must be something done to make sure this generation does not literally die from stress or the health issues they are more susceptible to. Until a solid solution to the issue can be made, teachers may need to be more considerate towards their mentally decaying students and try not to submerge them with everything.During the hours of total darkness, only lighted by the moon of the outside sky, a majority of the world is shutting off their conscious minds by closing their eyelids and falling into a slumber in order to regain energy for the following day. Everyone, except for the teens and college students trying to become the productive members of society they so wish us to be.

The student news site of Parkview High School
Sleep is for the weak when college admissions are involved