World Trade Center memorial commemorates 9/11

Conor Flynn, Staff Writer

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Over 11 years ago, Flights 11 and 175 crashed into the World Trade Center, more commonly known as the Twin Towers. The United States, along with the rest of the world, watched in horror for almost an hour as the two magnificent buildings slowly crumbled and fell. September 11 will remain a tragic day in the eyes of America, and those we lost will never be forgotten.

However, a new hope has literally risen. Beginning in 2002, the World Trade Center Memorial began taking shape. Plans were drawn up, ideas collected, and cleanup projects initiated. Since then, the site of the original World Trade Center, Ground Zero, has constantly been under development, the detritus has been removed, and a new building has been inducted. The WTC Museum and Memorial has been set up to commemorate the terrorist attacks of September 11 as well as the bombing in 1993 that killed six people.

In the museum, visitors can take a virtual tour of the original towers and learn about every victim of the attack, as well as view actual pieces of both planes and the towers themselves. At the memorial, the giant sunken reflecting pools—both located at the exact spots of the former towers—commemorate just what America lost and mourned.

The WTC Museum and Memorial isn’t the only thing taking New York City by storm. Ever since April 30 of this year, the replacement World Trade Center, known as Freedom Tower, has been the tallest building in the city. The design for the tower was unveiled in 2005 and construction began right away. Upon completion in 2013, this monument to those we lost will be the tallest building in theWestern Hemisphereand third tallest in the world. It will provide the same function as the Twin Towers, and only five less floors—105. However, on the top of the building will be a massive spire, ultimately reaching 1,776 feet, the year Americawon its independence.

Not only do these projects remind us what we lost, they also signify what Americans can do: stand back up after being knocked down. While the new tower and the museum stand in the city, the memory of the lofty sentinels will never be forgotten. In this sense, the Twin Towers have never really left New York’s skyline.